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Try a Little Empathy (on teaching children about poverty)

Bolivian children

Bolivian children spend their days outside. Photo: ©2011 Matthew Paul Turner/World Vision

My children were born into a life of stability, not poverty. We’ve had seasons where we had to watch our spending very closely, but they don’t know what it’s like to live day to day or hour-by-hour, which is a beautiful thing.

But it also means that our selfishness is powerful. As parents, we need to teach our kids how to weaken their selfishness. By learning to expand their field of vision to include others, empathize, and then both recognize and shoulder the responsibility that accompanies a life of stability, they can help others who lack it.

We can’t (and probably shouldn’t) completely kill selfishness—it’s a survival skill deeply embedded in our DNA. But we can redefine what serves ourselves to include the thriving of all humans, not just us.

Read the rest at the World Vision blog, where I’m guest-posting today. (comments closed here)

What Does Wielding My White Privilege for Good Look Like?

Joy with her sign at a Trump protest March 2016

I know that I am privileged. (This is a very interesting survey to explore how privileged you may be. I got a 64 out of 100.)

I know that in spite of my concerted efforts to listen, learn, and look, I still have massive blind spots, unidentified biases, and gaps in my education and understanding.

I also know that many people in my circle need to make their own concerted efforts to find, acknowledge, and confront their biases.

I hear (and agree) from my minority friends and thought leaders that as such, I have a responsibility to speak to/teach the people in my circle.

I also know from years of relationship with them that many of these people are firmly entrenched in their mindset. Some are family members, some are church family members. I often overhear conversations in which individuals state some variant of “If he/she cooperated, they’d still be alive” or “Affirmative action is racism against whites” or “Women can’t lead because they let their emotions get the best of them.”

I have family and friends who are in the military, the police force, and other related organizations. They are quick to defend these organizations and the individuals within. Of course. It is their career, or their husband’s/father’s/sister’s/wife’s that we’re talking about.

I get it. It’s scary to acknowledge the crack in the armor. What if the crack keeps cracking open wider and wider? What if it all falls apart? Getting anywhere close to asking yourself “If I’m wrong about this, what else am I wrong about?” is too much for most of us.

So, when those conversations take place in my hearing, often I stay quiet. I don’t contradict or question or challenge. Often, I leave altogether.

I stay quiet because I don’t believe they will change.

I stay quiet because it’s taken me 20-25 years to break down the bigoted ideas I had to the point where I am now, I know it takes time and courage and more time. I’ve been there. Until you find another life line to anchor everything to (mine is “love wins”), this is the most terrifying experience in life. And I’m afraid that any move I make could add to the terror, not help stabilize.

I stay quiet because I know that pushing too hard can cause people to dig in deeper, harder, more stubborn. When people push me, I immediately resist.

I stay quiet because I believe that my energies are best focused on younger, more malleable people.

I stay quiet because this is someone I care about. This is my family/friend/neighbor/etc and I don’t want to create drama or “borrow trouble” (which is something I constantly tell my kids to avoid).

I stay quiet because I think it might work better for us to outlive the bigoted baby boomers and baby busters. Because I think it’s far more likely that we can make change with my generation and younger. Because I have no hope.

Maybe these are excuses. Maybe I stay quiet because I’m a coward.

buttons on Joy's backpack

I don’t LIVE quiet.

I am not secretive about what I believe.

I do what I can with my privilege to elevate other voices and open doors for them. I’m trying to live this, walk this out in my everyday life. I’m trying to show, not tell (one of the cardinal rules of writing).

Is that enough?

How do we DO this? How do I actually and effectively engage bigoted and willfully closed-minded thinking within the context of the relationships I have? How do I push just enough to be heard but not so hard that they slam the door in my face and move deeper into bigotry?


P.S. Hi. I’m back, at least for now. I have no idea how often I will write, or where this blog may go. But what’s happening in the United States right now is too important not to engage. I have this, so I’m using it.

Infiltrating Injustice: With What Should We Fill the Racial Divide?

Today, A Deeper Story is running what is most likely my last post for the group site. At the end of February, we will stop publishing new material (though the archives will stay indefinitely). I’m not sure yet what I will do with this new void in my personal writing schedule, but I do know this – I will keep writing. The work of finding common ground and understanding within our stories is not done, and it will never be.

ferguson protests

Today, I’m thinking about racism and injustice and where to go from here. Some friends I trust who identify with other ethnicities have read it and given me their feedback before I published it.

Mostly, I have questions about what’s going on right now, like “Are things actually worse this year? Is fate or God or the weight of years of injustice finally pressing our faces into our own steaming pile of shit, forcing us to acknowledge things we’ve always before managed to shove out of our collective consciousness?

I’m closing comments here, so I hope you’ll click over to read the full post and join the conversation in the comments there.

Image credit: Otto Yamamoto/The All-Nite Images, CC-BY-SA